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Today's Features

  • 2016 is a golden year for John and Kathleen Davis of Evergreen in two ways:

    First, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in March.

    Second, they are celebrating their 50th anniversary as volunteers with the Evergreen Players this month.

    Those who have worked with the Davises agree wholeheartedly that the couple are worth their weight in gold.

  • The Mountain Area Pregnancy Center has a new name, a new look and new services for expectant mothers, couples and families.

    Life’s Options will continue to offer free pregnancy tests, counseling and parenting classes and is looking to add ultrasound services in the coming months.

    The nonprofit was previously located inside the Mother’s Closet at 27884 Meadow Drive, but now has moved into office space on the north side of the same complex at 27888 Meadow Drive. Mother’s Closet has been remodeled but remains in the same location.

  • At 9 p.m. Friday, the lights at the Evergreen High football field went dark. Dozens of people broke glow sticks and continued walking on the track.

    And everyone was quiet. Not a word or a whisper. Nothing but the soft footsteps, the glowing sticks, and the names that guided their walk: John. Susan. Tyler. Vic. Mom. Dad. Friend. Loved one.

  • To paraphrase a proverb: There’s a place for everyone, and everyone has a place.

    No truer words could describe Mountain Community Pathways, an Evergreen program for adults with disabilities. The program, in its third year, provides a place for those with special needs to learn, grow and make friends for six hours a day, five days a week.

    It also operates a home in Evergreen for three developmentally disabled clients and provides a home host provider network so developmentally disabled adults can live in homes other than with their families.

  • Four boys ducked into a niche with computers and other office equipment — an effective hiding spot. After a few minutes, they decided it was time to make a run for it. One of them pushed a chair in front of him as a shield. Another yelled, “For the rebellion!” A library staff member reminded them to keep their laser guns visible — otherwise they’d be cheating.

  • If there can be Christmas in July, why not New Year’s in August?

    With all the ceremony of the giant ball in Times Square, a net full of nearly 4,500 yellow ducks dropped in Evergreen on Saturday to the cheers of spectators, kicking off the seventh annual Dam Ducky Derby.

  • As Lindy hoppers and hepcats alike gathered in the Elks ballroom during the 15th annual Evergreen Jazz Festival on Friday, the sounds of musicians warming up drifted from the stage. Those notes did not come from professionals but from young, up-and-coming musicians.

  • As the Fat Babies closed down the Elks Lodge ballroom on Saturday night, most of the band took a break while a trio of piano, drums and clarinet serenaded the dozen or so couples who remained on the dance floor. And, for a moment, the ballroom felt alive with the presence of past generations of jazz fans and musicians. The band seemed fuller than its three pieces.

    For newcomers and those unfamiliar with the genre, the 2016 Evergreen Jazz Festival was a new experience. But for many of the festival attendees, jazz music and dancing are not only a hobby but a tradition.

  • For Evergreen High School graduates who attend the old-timers reunion each year, it’s about homecoming.

    The grads catch up at a potluck lunch at Evergreen Lutheran Church. Saturday’s gathering, the 31st for the old-timers, was no exception.

    “It’s about history and connections and seeing former classmates,” said Donna Long Beck, class of 1967, who attended with her mom, Betty Fields Long, class of 1942.

  • The Great Plains in general, and Kansas in particular, might seem like a barren landscape compared to the breathtaking beauty of the Colorado Rockies. Frontier explorer Zebulon Pike certainly thought so, supposedly calling the region the “Great American Desert.”

    But photographer Jim Griggs of McPherson, Kan., says that, if photographing the Great Plains has taught him anything, it’s that “if you can take good photos there, you can take them anywhere.”