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Today's Features

  • Soccer is a kick. But who’s to say soccer can’t also be spooky, when the season suits?

    Evergreen’s Bergen Valley Elementary hosted the fourth annual Rocky Mountain Spook-out 3-versus-3 soccer tournament Sunday.

  • Imagine that you don’t know how to use a smart phone. Or are unsure how to “Google” something on the Internet. Or you can’t open Microsoft Word to type this sentence.

    Some people reading this don’t have to imagine.

    A fair portion of seniors, both in Evergreen and nationwide, never learned those computer skills, and are now at a disadvantage in the workforce because of it.

    However, Evergreen Christian Outreach is working to change that.

  • Once upon a time, people found a mystical forest near their town. No matter what they threw into the forest — beer cans, televisions, couches, animal carcasses — it all magically disappeared. The forest seemed to swallow everything the townspeople dumped there.

    To their chagrin, local residents have found the magical portal where all this trash has spewed out — at various turnouts along Squaw Pass Road. And, on Oct. 26, they gathered to clean up these illegal dumping sites.

  • If smiles and chatter were any indication, trick-or-treating at Elk Run Assisted Living on Friday night was beyond successful.

    Kids in costumes — superheroes, movie characters, animals and more — moved through the building, greeting residents with familiar words: “trick or treat,” “thank you” and “happy Halloween.”

  • By Andrea Tritschler, for the Courier

    Hands reached for the brilliantly colored and intricately designed bowls in wild excitement to find the perfect one. A large number of the 600 hand-painted, ceramic bowls went home with guests at the eighth annual Mountain Bowls Project, a fund-raising event for the Mountain Resource Center.

    On Oct. 18, the fund-raiser brought community members together for lunch and dinner with something special to take home. Each guest chose one of the bowls, which had been donated by the community.

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Nov. 3 will be a homecoming of sorts for John McEuen.

    The California native, who is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966, lived in Clear Creek for 20 years.

    “It’s nice,” McEuen said in an interview, noting that Idaho Spring is close to skiing and not too far from the Denver airport. “There are nice people; it was a growing little town.”

  • By Andrea Tritschler, For the Courier

    Tucked away on the side of Pleasant Park Road is a small, old cemetery, so much a part of the landscape it often goes unnoticed.

    But on Saturday, the Conifer Historical Society made Kemp Cemetery the star of its show, with a tour that highlighted why.

  • Storytellers use all sorts of devices to convey their tales — visual aids, sound effects, lighting and shadows. But few storytellers actually become the story themselves.

    For biographical actors R.D. and Barb Melfi of Pine, this is the essence of their work — not merely acting the role, but living it.

    The Melfis have portrayed William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Annie Oakley, as well as other historical figures, across the country at schools, festivals, shows and conventions, and in movies and commercials.

  • At the convention of Colorado’s “Do Nothing Party,” the villain A. Beast — pronounced “best”; the “a” is silent — enters to boos and hisses, and proclaims that he is “one of the convention plotters — I mean, planners.”

    These are only a few of the amusing moments that pervade the melodrama “Peril at the Polls.”

  • Every fall, families across the mountain area welcome their old friend Jack — Jack O. Lantern, that is.

    Of course, to find Jack, many trek to their local pumpkin patch to pick out exactly what he will look like this year. Among rows of pumpkins and gourds, visitors young and old decide: taller or smaller; more round or more flat; yellow, orange, red or white.

    Many Evergreen residents, such as Jamie Brand and her children Gus, 9, and Anna, 7, have visited or will visit JP Total’s Pumpkin Patch as part of their annual fall tradition.