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Today's Features

  • Think of the Evergreen High School marching band as the little engine that could.

    With only 52 members including the color guard — half of them freshmen and only five of them seniors — the band took seventh place in the 3A state championship in Colorado Springs last week. The band competes regularly against bands at least twice its size.

  • The historic Bergen Park Church building will be the new home of the Center for the Arts Evergreen — after an extended search, the arts group's capital campaign committee purchased the property on Friday for $500,000.

    “We’re very excited about this space,” said Steve Sumner, CAE's executive director.

    The new location has four times the space of the Miller House, where CAE has been operating for the past 10 years, Sumner said. And its location is ideal, he added.

  • Saturday was a night for screams and terror — and some fun, too — at the Haunting in Evergreen haunted house at Church of the Transfiguration.

    From the ghost and spider inviting visitors into the parking lot to the 9-foot-tall goblin available for photographs outside, to the Frankenstein, werewolf and other beasties inside, the haunted house had something to terrify everyone.

  • Iron Man attended the Superhero Training Academy on Oct. 21 at the Evergreen Library.

    Portrayed by 5-year-old Declan Van Praag of Evergreen, Iron Man was ready to save the world in his mask, cape and cuff, which he designed at the training academy to enhance his superpowers.

    Declan’s Iron Man character was definitely his take on the superhero: His Iron Man ironed clothes. He ran around the library meeting room, holding his hand up and pretending to iron the clothes of the people he saved.

  • Halloween pumpkins can make a haute fashion statement.

    At Creative Bridges in Kittredge, children at a special pumpkin-decorating class on Friday didn’t just carve, they added earrings, necklaces, hair and accessories to create fashionable gourds for Halloween.

  • If you want to teach seventh-graders about the parts of a cell, what better way than to put them inside one?

    Reminiscent of the “The Magic School Bus” television show, Evergreen Middle School students recently entered a giant “cell” that filled a classroom. They didn’t have to shrink to get inside a la the TV show, but they did have to crouch a bit to get into the cell made of large pieces of tarp taped together with duct tape. A little imagination helped, too.

  • TallGrass Aveda Salon and Spa is expanding its seventh annual Soldier Box Project with plans to ship at least 100 care packages to troops in Afghanistan this holiday season, said TallGrass owner Gail Ridings.

  • Four arts organizations in Evergreen have received grants from Colorado Creates, a program of Colorado Creative Industries.

    The Evergreen Players are planning to use their $6,500 grant for an educational project called E.P. Studio One, said John Davis, a board member of the organization.

    “It’s theater arts: acting, improv, set design,” Davis said of the initiative. “We’ve been working on this for a long time.”

  • A premiere exhibit at the Center for the Arts Evergreen showcases the creative talents of four area high school teachers.

    Steve Sumner, CAE director, is excited about this first-time opportunity to display the exemplary work of teachers who find time to be artists in addition to their responsibilities as art instructors.

    “They’re really worthy,” he said.

  • You couldn’t open a newspaper or Web browser this summer without hearing about the new novel “Go Set a Watchman.” This book was the second published novel of Harper Lee, the famous author of the beloved classic “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Although the new book’s release caused a resurgence in interest in the reclusive author, interest in Lee’s first book never waned, and “To Kill a Mockingbird” is one of the best-selling novels of all time.