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Today's Features

  • Every year, many Evergreen residents celebrate Celtic culture with some green beer and a rousing St. Paddy’s Day party. However, the luck of the Irish — and the Scottish, for that matter — can be found throughout the year at true Celtic celebrations.

    The Evergreen Chorale’s Celtic Celebration brings some of this luck to Evergreen in April. It’s more than just a few shamrocks and leprechauns, however. The chorale brings the traditional sounds and tastes of Irish and Scottish culture to the Rockies.

  • For as long as we can remember, the news has been filled with stories of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The ongoing strife in this tiny region of the world dominates the global airwaves. How much do we really know about the people born into these circumstances — the individuals whose lives are defined by the geography of their birth? The Evergreen Players takes on these questions in the regional premiere of “Sixteen Wounded,” which opened March 6 at Center/Stage Theater.

  • You’ll be hearing a lot about birthdays this year in the Evergreen area. On July 4, 1859, the Bergen family finished building their cabin in today’s Bergen Park, among the first settlers to put down roots in the area. In celebration of the 150th anniversary of this “founding” of Evergreen, John Steinle, administrator at the Hiwan Homestead Museum, has teamed with the Center for the Arts Evergreen.

    On Wednesday, March 25, Steinle will present a photo journey through Evergreen’s past via historic photos from the museum’s collection.

  • Art fans who enjoy room to move and space to breathe will love the revamped and revivified version of the Evergreen Fine Art Gallery. It’s the same building, but you’d swear it’s a different space, with the rooms rehung in a museum-style configuration. The walls seem broader, with more space between each work and several works by each artist grouped together. The gallery’s striking glass collection has been moved downstairs to the main level, and the gift area filled with designer and vintage jewelry, as well as small sculptural pieces, has been expanded.

  • Have you seen a human-sized cheese grater heading up I-70 recently? How about a teapot the size of a teenager? If so, you’re not losing your mind. It’s just the crew of Evergreen High School’s theater department trekking up the hill with costumes for their latest production of “Beauty and the Beast.”

    “This show has the best of everything in it,” says director Fran Arniotes. “When you do Disney, you can just have fun with it. The costumes are larger than life, and the cast is phenomenal.”

  • Each spring the Evergreen Chorale stages its annual musical, but this year the Chorale is trying a new format: Rather than one staged musical, the Chorale will feature musical excerpts from 10 of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s most famous shows. The songs will be staged with costumes and choreography so the audience gets the best and brightest from Lloyd Webber’s signature works.

  • Evergreen and Conifer were well represented at Music Theater International’s 2009 Junior Theater Festival in Atlanta.

    Out of 34 children’s theater schools nationwide, members of Evergreen’s Colorado Children’s Theater took home the award for best acting group, and one member of the theater, Chapman Hyatt, 14, took home the award for best actor.

    More than 1,400 kids and their theater teachers gathered for a weekend in January to show off their acting skills and learn new ones at workshops with professionals.

  • In today’s media, we are constantly bombarded with red-carpet shots of celebrities arriving for world premieres. Oftentimes, the pomp and circumstance are greater than the quality of the show contained within.

    In the case of the Denver Center Theater Company, the reverse is true. January is New Play Month at the Denver Center, and two new works for the stage, “Inana” and “Dusty and Big Bad World,” have premiered in recent weeks. What they lack in spectacle outside the theater, they more than make up for in substance on stage.

  • Amber Lichfield has the gentle manner and animated expressions that would make any preschooler feel welcome in her classroom. She is not, however, a preschool teacher. Lichfield is a middle school math teacher at Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen — and an artist.

  • Music has touched the life of every member of the Evergreen Chamber Orchestra. Each musician fondly remembers his first experience with classical music, and looks forward to the opportunity every year to bring that joy to another generation of young people. Such opportunities for musical discovery and collaboration will take place this year at the Mountain Area Orchestra Festival.