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Today's Features

  • By Penny Randell, for the Courier

    Beginning this Friday, StageDoor Theatre in Conifer will present "Fiddler on the Roof," an ambitious production chosen to encourage as many high school students as possible to participate.

    The senior high company at StageDoor took on the beloved musical, which premiered on Broadway in 1964 and then was made into a cherished movie in 1971. 

  • By Andrea Tritschler, for the Courier

    Hands reached for the brilliantly colored and intricately designed bowls in wild excitement to find the perfect one. A large number of the 600 hand-painted, ceramic bowls went home with guests at the eighth annual Mountain Bowls Project, a fund-raising event for the Mountain Resource Center.

    On Oct. 18, the fund-raiser brought community members together for lunch and dinner with something special to take home. Each guest chose one of the bowls, which had been donated by the community.

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Nov. 3 will be a homecoming of sorts for John McEuen.

    The California native, who is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966, lived in Clear Creek for 20 years.

    “It’s nice,” McEuen said in an interview, noting that Idaho Spring is close to skiing and not too far from the Denver airport. “There are nice people; it was a growing little town.”

  • By Andrea Tritschler, For the Courier

    Tucked away on the side of Pleasant Park Road is a small, old cemetery, so much a part of the landscape it often goes unnoticed.

    But on Saturday, the Conifer Historical Society made Kemp Cemetery the star of its show, with a tour that highlighted why.

  • Storytellers use all sorts of devices to convey their tales — visual aids, sound effects, lighting and shadows. But few storytellers actually become the story themselves.

    For biographical actors R.D. and Barb Melfi of Pine, this is the essence of their work — not merely acting the role, but living it.

    The Melfis have portrayed William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Annie Oakley, as well as other historical figures, across the country at schools, festivals, shows and conventions, and in movies and commercials.

  • At the convention of Colorado’s “Do Nothing Party,” the villain A. Beast — pronounced “best”; the “a” is silent — enters to boos and hisses, and proclaims that he is “one of the convention plotters — I mean, planners.”

    These are only a few of the amusing moments that pervade the melodrama “Peril at the Polls.”

  • Every fall, families across the mountain area welcome their old friend Jack — Jack O. Lantern, that is.

    Of course, to find Jack, many trek to their local pumpkin patch to pick out exactly what he will look like this year. Among rows of pumpkins and gourds, visitors young and old decide: taller or smaller; more round or more flat; yellow, orange, red or white.

    Many Evergreen residents, such as Jamie Brand and her children Gus, 9, and Anna, 7, have visited or will visit JP Total’s Pumpkin Patch as part of their annual fall tradition.

  • A bin filled with two dozen clothes hangers sat on a table outside the Conifer King Soopers on Sunday, a sign that Susannah’s Hope is making a difference.

    The empty hangers signified that two dozen coats had been given away to people who needed or wanted them.

    Susannah’s Hope is the pet project of Mary Black that has turned into a ministry at Risen Lord Lutheran Church in Conifer. Black’s goal is simple: keep people warm.

  • Artists often refrain from providing context for their works. Instead, they leave their work open to personal interpretation, expecting that each painting, photograph or sculpture will bring a unique meaning to each viewer.

    But in a new exhibit called “Storytelling,” opening Saturday at the Mirada Fine Art Gallery in Indian Hills, art lovers will have an opportunity they do not always have — to learn background about each of the 30 to 40 pieces on display.

  • Neal Hurley looks less like a patient and more like a young up-and-comer in his slacks, dress shoes and button-down. The 36-year-old spends his days putting his computer engineering degree to work at Guaranty Bank and Trust in Denver, and makes time for his girlfriend, Angie. Autumn is one of his favorite times of the year — the changing foliage makes for great photographs.