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Today's Features

  • To get his students’ attention, Rabbi Jamie Arnold starts singing a catchy, simple song. Within a few seconds, the 20 or so classmates interrupt their conversations and join in. Then the group pauses for reflection.

    “Take a breath like it’s your first,” Arnold tells them. “Enjoy the breath like it’s your last.”

  • A cornucopia of vegetables and fruits adorned two tables at the Buffalo Park Community Garden on Saturday as part of the youth farmers market.

    Cabbage, zucchini, carrots, turnips, tomatoes, green beans, apples, pears and plums were among the items for sale, and a steady stream of shoppers snapped them up. Several agreed they got quality produce at affordable prices.

    Teachers and students from Wilmot Elementary and Evergreen High School work at the farmers market at the community garden, which is in front of Wilmot.

  • At 810 feet, 8 and 3/8 inches, the world’s longest picnic table could seat a theoretical family of more than 800 people. A person sitting at one end would have to spend more than three minutes walking 300 steps to see her relatives at the other.

    And this theoretical family was, briefly, a reality as the Evergreen community came together to celebrate the Guinness Book of World Records’ confirmed longest picnic table ever.

  • By Penny Randell, For the Courier

    Eighty-eight artists from throughout Colorado will exhibit 160 pieces at the annual All Colorado Artists Show in Evergreen during the first three weeks of October. 

    The exhibition, at the Main Street Fine Art Gallery downtown, is a juried show designed to attract some of the best artists in Colorado. It will run from Sept. 30 to Oct. 23, with an opening reception Friday, Sept. 30.

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier 

    Live music, hula-hooping, children’s games and local artists filled Kittredge Community Park for eight hours Saturday for the annual Kittredge Canyonfest. 

    The event, hosted by the Kittredge Civic Association, has been a fall staple of the community for nearly 30 years, according to co-organizer Brenna Witt.

  • It’s one thing to see art in a gallery; it’s quite another to see art in studios with artists available to answer questions and talk about their work.

    That’s what the annual Open Door Studios is all about, and attendees at last weekend’s event said they appreciated the one-on-one with artists.

    “It’s lovely to talk with the artists to learn more about their work,” said Eli Barringer of Evergreen, who was experiencing Open Door Studios for the first time.

  • It wasn’t a typical Tuesday night crowd that started drifting onto the deck at Cactus Jack’s about 5 p.m. Sept. 13.

    On average the guests probably had a decade or two on the creek-side saloon’s customary clientele, and most of them rolled in on Subarus and Acuras instead of Harleys and Hondas. But if they wore more Lacoste than Levi Strauss, they’d come for a live jam just the same.

  • The Evergreen Chorale is kicking off its 44th season Friday with the Lerner and Loewe musical “My Fair Lady.”

    The show’s director, Tim Kennedy of Westminster, said performances will run until Oct. 9. The production includes 33 cast members, 10 crew members and nine orchestra players. The run time is a little over two-and-a-half hours, he said.

  • Today’s high school freshmen weren’t yet born on Sept. 11, 2001. The youngsters climbed anyway.

    Many who attended Sunday weren’t in New York, Washington or Pennsylvania on that horrific day, and don’t know anyone who was. And still they climbed.

    Some participants weren’t firefighters and didn’t have any connection to first responders. And yet they climbed as well.

  • Each pot of chili told a different story. Some were old family recipes. Some were experiments with new recipes. Some had a kick that made eyes water; others evinced a sweeter side. There were pots of green and red; pork, beef, chicken and vegetarian. Each batch as diverse as the individuals who made and served it.

    Saturday’s Big Chili Cook-off at Buchanan Park drew thousands of people to spend the day outside listening to music, eating chili, and supporting six mountain area fire departments.