Today's Features

  • The love of both motorcycles and canines converged on Sunday at Chow Down in Bergen Park as nearly 200 bikers participated in the Molly-Dharma Run, with this year’s beneficiary the Evergreen Animal Protective League.

    Participants rode from the Platte River Bar & Grill in Littleton to Evergreen to meet some of EAPL’s adoptable pets, then on to Central City, returning to the T-Bird Roadhouse in Wheat Ridge for a party and silent auction. EAPL will receive the proceeds from registration fees and the auction.

  • On a single nature outing, 9-year-old Jenna Audlin spotted more than 20 different Evergreen critters.

    “We went out here at 7 o’clock, like, a week ago to a birding-thingy, and we saw 18 species of birds and 20 species of animals,” Jenna said.

    Jenna is the co-author of the new “Explore More! Outdoor Challenge for Kids” activity book. Created in 2015 by the Evergreen Nature Center, the Explore More! Outdoor Challenge encourages both kids and adults alike to get outside for improved well-being.

  • Mirada Fine Art in Indian Hills has been named the best art gallery in the Denver area as part of the 2016 Denver A-List awards. Five years after it was a finalist for the award, the gallery bested more than 100 other galleries from across the state, including the Space Gallery and Robischon Gallery in Denver.

    According to co-owner Steve Sonnen, the honor is a validation of the gallery’s efforts since it opened in 2009.

  • During World War II, it was common for households to place stars in their windows to represent how many family members were in the armed forces. And, if one of them died serving their country, the star would be replaced with a gold one.

    “There were six gold stars on my block in Kansas City,” American Legion member and World War II veteran Charles Purcell said on Memorial Day. “One for my next-door neighbor. One for an only child. One for my brother ... Today we celebrate those ‘gold stars.’ “

  • Morgan Wolfers’ picture of a spotted tiger moth and its pearl-like eggs is the kind of image you expect from a seasoned photographer: clean, micro-focused, incredibly detailed.

    But the image betrays both an illusion of size and years of experience.

    At 10 years old, the Conifer youth has accomplished what some photographers might only dream of: His work is on display at the Washington, D.C., home of Vice President Joe Biden.

  • Some young Evergreen students proved they have solid artistic skills Friday night at a Sculpture Evergreen art contest reception at Evergreen National Bank.

    Students at Marshdale and Wilmot elementary schools and Evergreen Middle School participated in the contest, in which students used one of Evergreen’s many sculptures as inspiration for their own artwork.

    This is the first time Sculpture Evergreen has held a contest for elementary and middle school students, according to Jane Stewart, the contest organizer.

  • Kai Bianco is finding his independence.

    The little boy, who was bitten in the head by the family dog when he was 9 months old, turned 3 on Tuesday. This fall, he starts preschool at Fletcher Miller School for children with special needs in Lakewood to get some additional physical and speech therapy, but his parents hope he will be at the same development level as his peers and ready to attend Wilmot Preschool in 2017.

    Kai went to a playground near his Evergreen home with his parents, Brandon Bianco and Shelby Foley, and they talked about his progress.

  • Editor’s note: The Canyon Courier is following three people hoping to complete the Evergreen Fire/Rescue academy to get their firefighting certification. This is the first in a series of stories about what it takes to become a firefighter.

    Imagine Evergreen Fire/Rescue personnel as being similar to pied pipers: They try to lead as many as possible down the path to become firefighters.

  • Astronomy enthusiasts and passers-by alike caught a rare glimpse of Mercury’s transit across the sun on May 9, the first time the phenomenon had occurred since 2006.

    “If you look about nine o’clock, there should be a clean black dot. The ones in the center are fuzzy sunspots,” said Mike Dempsey, a naturalist at Lookout Mountain Nature Center who was stationed at Mount Falcon Park with a $2,000 telescope donated by volunteers and equipped with a filter to make the viewing possible.

  • The Evergreen Masters Swim Team might be misnamed.

    While the team does hold swim practices twice weekly at Wulf Recreation Center, its mostly female members don’t limit themselves to the pool.

    “It’s not just swimming,” said member Kristine Stevens. “It’s a life experience.”