.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Storytellers use all sorts of devices to convey their tales — visual aids, sound effects, lighting and shadows. But few storytellers actually become the story themselves.

    For biographical actors R.D. and Barb Melfi of Pine, this is the essence of their work — not merely acting the role, but living it.

    The Melfis have portrayed William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Annie Oakley, as well as other historical figures, across the country at schools, festivals, shows and conventions, and in movies and commercials.

  • At the convention of Colorado’s “Do Nothing Party,” the villain A. Beast — pronounced “best”; the “a” is silent — enters to boos and hisses, and proclaims that he is “one of the convention plotters — I mean, planners.”

    These are only a few of the amusing moments that pervade the melodrama “Peril at the Polls.”

  • Every fall, families across the mountain area welcome their old friend Jack — Jack O. Lantern, that is.

    Of course, to find Jack, many trek to their local pumpkin patch to pick out exactly what he will look like this year. Among rows of pumpkins and gourds, visitors young and old decide: taller or smaller; more round or more flat; yellow, orange, red or white.

    Many Evergreen residents, such as Jamie Brand and her children Gus, 9, and Anna, 7, have visited or will visit JP Total’s Pumpkin Patch as part of their annual fall tradition.

  • A bin filled with two dozen clothes hangers sat on a table outside the Conifer King Soopers on Sunday, a sign that Susannah’s Hope is making a difference.

    The empty hangers signified that two dozen coats had been given away to people who needed or wanted them.

    Susannah’s Hope is the pet project of Mary Black that has turned into a ministry at Risen Lord Lutheran Church in Conifer. Black’s goal is simple: keep people warm.

  • Artists often refrain from providing context for their works. Instead, they leave their work open to personal interpretation, expecting that each painting, photograph or sculpture will bring a unique meaning to each viewer.

    But in a new exhibit called “Storytelling,” opening Saturday at the Mirada Fine Art Gallery in Indian Hills, art lovers will have an opportunity they do not always have — to learn background about each of the 30 to 40 pieces on display.

  • Neal Hurley looks less like a patient and more like a young up-and-comer in his slacks, dress shoes and button-down. The 36-year-old spends his days putting his computer engineering degree to work at Guaranty Bank and Trust in Denver, and makes time for his girlfriend, Angie. Autumn is one of his favorite times of the year — the changing foliage makes for great photographs.

  • Artists find inspiration everywhere, even their own backyard.

    Last week, Jeffco Open Space parks hosted more than 25 professional painters from Colorado and other states as part of the first ever In Plein Sight — an outdoor “plein air” event and art sale organized by PLAN Jeffco.

    Organizers said the idea came from one of the participating artists, who had done a plein air painting event in Douglas County parks, and suggested that PLAN Jeffco and Jeffco Open Space could host one as well.

  • By Penny Randell, For the Courier

    StageDoor Theatre in Conifer will bring the cult classic “The Rocky Horror Show” to the stage on three weekends this month — including a couple of late-night showings designed to appeal to the movie’s devoted fans.

    The high-energy musical, a campy rock ‘n’ roll tribute to sci-fi and horror flicks, is rated PG-18 and is billed to thrill an adult audience.

  • To get his students’ attention, Rabbi Jamie Arnold starts singing a catchy, simple song. Within a few seconds, the 20 or so classmates interrupt their conversations and join in. Then the group pauses for reflection.

    “Take a breath like it’s your first,” Arnold tells them. “Enjoy the breath like it’s your last.”

  • A cornucopia of vegetables and fruits adorned two tables at the Buffalo Park Community Garden on Saturday as part of the youth farmers market.

    Cabbage, zucchini, carrots, turnips, tomatoes, green beans, apples, pears and plums were among the items for sale, and a steady stream of shoppers snapped them up. Several agreed they got quality produce at affordable prices.

    Teachers and students from Wilmot Elementary and Evergreen High School work at the farmers market at the community garden, which is in front of Wilmot.