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Today's Features

  • The bands might not be very well known, but the familiar intimate stage, theater seating and stories about the musicians’ songs and inspirations are making Conifer Loves Music a local attraction.

    The music series kicked off its second round of shows last weekend at StageDoor Theatre — headlined by Denver/New York City-based band The Winchester Local and Texas rock band Lindby.

    But before either band took the stage, Conifer’s Ben Powell opened the show, performing his music live for the very first time.

  • By Kevin M. Smith, for the Courier

    Mountain area residents got into the holiday spirit on Saturday with the fifth annual Festival of Trees and Wine & Dine event at The Barn at Evergreen Memorial Park.

    “It’s my favorite event,” said Sharon Trilk, who helps coordinate the gala with the Conifer Area Chamber of Commerce.

  • The heat was on Nov. 12 for the recruits in the Evergreen Fire/Rescue firefighter academy: They fought actual fires.

    The blazes were controlled in the department’s burn training building, but the flames and smoke were real — and the 18 recruits were both excited and apprehensive about practicing what they had learned for the past three months.

  • By Penny Randell, for the Courier

    The Evergreen Chorale will welcome a guest performance of “James and the Giant Peach” on Sunday at Center/Stage Theatre, acted and directed by the Phamaly Theatre Company from Denver. This professional-grade musical is for the whole family and promises to provide a festive path toward Thanksgiving.

  • “Service before self.”

    That message was shared by several members of the military and the community with West Jefferson Middle School during a Veterans Day ceremony Friday morning.

    “We went when we were called, to be part of something bigger than ourselves,” Sgt. 1st Class Peter Benning told the students during an assembly in the gymnasium.

  • West Jefferson Elementary students were given a special holiday treat on Friday: They attended the performance of a new Christmas play in ballet form.

    Peak Academy of Dance, which is a five-minute walk from the school, performed “A Christmas Eve Ghost Story” for the students.

    The story is written by Danielle Heller, owner of the dance studio, and is being published this year. In a strange twist, she wrote the book to fulfill her need for a new show that dancers at the studio could perform for the holidays.

  • Last Friday, Conifer’s Venue Theatre Company kicked off its fourth season with a stage adaptation of the 25-year old Disney film “Beauty and the Beast.”

    Directed by Nelson Conway, the three-hour musical sees nearly 30 students from five area high schools share the story of how Prince Adam — transformed into the animalistic Beast by an enchantress after refusing her shelter — captured the heart of bookish but kind Belle.

  • Colton Heidenfelder of Evergreen is building a mobile “tiny house” as a way of living a simple, affordable and yet still comfortable life.

    Heidenfelder, 22, and his uncle Scott Tuchscher of Arizona were finishing the exterior of the tiny house last month, before Tuchscher had to return home. Heidenfelder said his goal is to have the house completed by the spring, and to drive the trailer it’s built on to Conifer.

  • What is the scientific name for a leopard’s spots? How many children does Queen Elizabeth II have? Which actor gives the voiceover at the end of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”? Name all the eight shows that have won the prime-time Emmy for outstanding drama series since 2000.

    Lariat Lodge patrons put their gray matter to the test, stretching the limits of their random knowledge, as the Evergreen Library hosted its first-ever “Q’s and Brews” event recently at Lariat Lodge.

  • Those who served in the military during the Vietnam War not only faced live fire, they also found themselves in the political crosshairs as well. Many who enlisted or were drafted had not-so-friendly send-offs and even colder welcomes when they returned. As such, a whole generation of servicemen and women went unrecognized and unappreciated at the time.

    And now, as new generations of Americans grow older, they want to understand the circumstances that their parents and grandparents experienced firsthand.