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Today's Features

  • An artist’s space can tell so much. Do they work at home, or do they share a space with another artist? That toppling wooden chair that you love in an artist’s latest oil painting? Does it sit welcomingly in the corner of her studio — bathed in sunlight that streams in from the north? These are all questions that will be answered this weekend at the eighth annual Open Door Studios Tour in Evergreen.

  • Rick Bernstein has made a name for himself in Denver’s theater world as the founder and executive director of Miners Alley Playhouse in Golden. On Sept. 18, Bernstein brings his directing talent a little closer to home in his directorial debut with the Evergreen Chorale’s production of “Carousel.”

    “I’ll tell you, working at Center/Stage sure has saved on gas money,” laughs Bernstein. Bernstein and his wife, Paige Larson, also active in theater at Miners Alley and throughout Colorado, are Evergreen residents.

  • Robert Palmer has raised falcons since he was 12 years old. Over the past 40 years, he has raised and released every species of falcon it is legal to own. He photographs these and other birds in the wild for a living, and on days like today, he and Achilles, his 4-month-old gyrfalcon, man a booth at the Evergreen Fine Arts Festival.

    Set amid the evergreens in Heritage Grove, this year’s festival featured 118 different artists and drew more than 4,500 visitors on just the first day of the two-day event.

  • Word on the street is that people aren’t buying as much art. With the downturn in the economy, art — often considered a luxury item — can be one of the first purchases to go.

    Victoria Thomas, artist and owner of Kaleidoscope Gallery, hasn’t felt the pinch, though. In the last year, Thomas has seen a steady stream of sales of her unique found-mineral artwork, has opened her own gallery in Evergreen, and continues to expand her business in new directions.

  • After 43 years of doing something, one would think that you could make it almost perfect. Such is the case with the Evergreen Fine Arts Festival, set for Aug. 29-30. Annually, the Evergreen Artists Association hosts this two-day event, tucked among the old-growth Ponderosa pines in Heritage Grove near Hiwan Homestead Museum.

  • A great success is the best way to describe the first-ever Art in the Park at the Mountain Resource Center last week.

    The event, which provided free art activities for children and their parents, was expected to garner a couple dozen wannabe artists, but by the halfway point, at least 50 children had attended. And they all had messy, artistic fun.

    The kids painted birdhouses and made kites, hats, beaded necklaces and stamped booklets, and even painted canvas shoes.

  • The mission of the Center for the Arts Evergreen is to promote and cultivate artistic excellence and to enrich the art experience in our mountain community. For this reason, the upcoming collaboration at the center is exceptionally poignant. The Center for the Arts has teamed up with members from the Evergreen Chamber Orchestra to present an evening of art for all the senses.

  • Colorado is a long way from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan — the “U.P.,” for short. But when it comes to humor, Coloradans aren’t all that far away from Yoopers. Let’s face it — four crusty hunters, some Native American moonshine and a load of flatulence can make even the most prim of the populace giggle. And giggle is what you’ll do when the Evergreen Players open “Escanaba in da Moonlight” on July 10.

  • Summerfest has become an annual event in Evergreen — crowds gather to see great art, hear amazing music and enjoy all that is beautiful about our town. The Center for the Arts Evergreen has worked especially hard in recent years to ensure that Summerfest is not only a well-respected regional juried art show but to ensure that it is a community event that will continue for at least 30 more years.

  • Twelve local acts are tuning up to fight for stage time at the upcoming Conifer Mountain Music Festival.

    The bands will be battling it out at the first-ever Great Conifer Battle of the Bands on July 11 and 18 at McSwaine’s 285 Road House. Both competitions begin at noon. Seven bands will perform July 11, and five will perform July 18.

    The musical talent runs the gamut from seasoned rockers to younger acts and genres from punk rock to folk, but one thing remains the same for all 12: They’re ready for a good fight.