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Today's Features

  • “Psst…your bra strap is showing,” you whisper to your neighbor. Then you realize, that’s not an ordinary bra strap.

    You finally find the nerve to ask your friend why she has a black feather boa holding up her over-the-shoulder boulder holder. “Why, it’s to support my Purr-fect Pair,” she replies with a wink.

  • The curtain is going up on Conifer’s StageDoor Theatre, with a move to a bigger and better venue set to open in January.

    The new location, which is two doors down from its current spot in the Aspen Park Village shopping center, will have a larger stage, more seats and more productions, said Allan Van Horne, a spokesman and volunteer with StageDoor.

    The theater has busted its costumed buttons in the current space. The new space will occupy 5,000 square feet, double what it has now. It will have 125 seats and additional rehearsal space.

  • Do you ever wish that your children could experience up close and personal the wonder of orchestral music? All too frequently, symphonic and chamber works are set in a stuffy, silent, straight-laced setting that isn’t conducive to the often restless and curious nature of children. The Evergreen Chamber Orchestra has changed all of that with its upcoming Children’s Music Hour.

    On Sunday, Sept. 27, 13 members of the esteemed mountain orchestra will open the doors to music for children of all ages in a concert at the Center for the Arts Evergreen.

  • For centuries, angels have played a significant role in religious iconography, as well as becoming an accepted symbol in pop culture. Angels have been messengers, protectors and guardians, or simply cute cherub-like characters with wings and halos. Thanks to Evergreen Fine Art Gallery, the angel holds a treasured role in gift giving throughout the world.

  • An artist’s space can tell so much. Do they work at home, or do they share a space with another artist? That toppling wooden chair that you love in an artist’s latest oil painting? Does it sit welcomingly in the corner of her studio — bathed in sunlight that streams in from the north? These are all questions that will be answered this weekend at the eighth annual Open Door Studios Tour in Evergreen.

  • Rick Bernstein has made a name for himself in Denver’s theater world as the founder and executive director of Miners Alley Playhouse in Golden. On Sept. 18, Bernstein brings his directing talent a little closer to home in his directorial debut with the Evergreen Chorale’s production of “Carousel.”

    “I’ll tell you, working at Center/Stage sure has saved on gas money,” laughs Bernstein. Bernstein and his wife, Paige Larson, also active in theater at Miners Alley and throughout Colorado, are Evergreen residents.

  • Robert Palmer has raised falcons since he was 12 years old. Over the past 40 years, he has raised and released every species of falcon it is legal to own. He photographs these and other birds in the wild for a living, and on days like today, he and Achilles, his 4-month-old gyrfalcon, man a booth at the Evergreen Fine Arts Festival.

    Set amid the evergreens in Heritage Grove, this year’s festival featured 118 different artists and drew more than 4,500 visitors on just the first day of the two-day event.

  • Word on the street is that people aren’t buying as much art. With the downturn in the economy, art — often considered a luxury item — can be one of the first purchases to go.

    Victoria Thomas, artist and owner of Kaleidoscope Gallery, hasn’t felt the pinch, though. In the last year, Thomas has seen a steady stream of sales of her unique found-mineral artwork, has opened her own gallery in Evergreen, and continues to expand her business in new directions.

  • After 43 years of doing something, one would think that you could make it almost perfect. Such is the case with the Evergreen Fine Arts Festival, set for Aug. 29-30. Annually, the Evergreen Artists Association hosts this two-day event, tucked among the old-growth Ponderosa pines in Heritage Grove near Hiwan Homestead Museum.

  • A great success is the best way to describe the first-ever Art in the Park at the Mountain Resource Center last week.

    The event, which provided free art activities for children and their parents, was expected to garner a couple dozen wannabe artists, but by the halfway point, at least 50 children had attended. And they all had messy, artistic fun.

    The kids painted birdhouses and made kites, hats, beaded necklaces and stamped booklets, and even painted canvas shoes.