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Today's Features

  • Environmental concerns — including high lead levels in tap water at Jeffco schools, a dangerous chemical found buried at the Lockheed-Martin plant in South Jeffco, and the effects of planned development in the Rooney Valley — dominated the headlines in Jefferson County news last year.

    Toxic waste found buried at Lockheed Martin facility

  • Turmoil at a local charter school, a state representative sent to jail, and community cleanup efforts were among the top stories in the mountain area in 2016. 

    Rocky Mountain Academy finds a path forward

    Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen is moving forward after many months of discord that culminated in a protest by parents and students in October.

  • In many respects, 2016 was a year characterized by loss in the 285 Corridor — none perhaps felt as much as the loss of Park County sheriff’s Cpl. Nate Carrigan, who died Feb. 24 during a shoot-out after officers attempted to serve a “high-risk” eviction notice to Bailey resident Martin Wirth.

    Wirth reportedly opened fire on the officers with a legally obtained .45-caliber rifle, killing Carrigan and wounding Deputy Kolby Martin and Capt. Mark Hancock. Wirth died at the scene.

  • Most people see a chair as merely a place to sit. Jonathan Gerspach, though, has a deep-seated tendency to view chairs — and other pieces of furniture — as works of art.

    For Gerspach, a single chair can represent hours of work — designing, measuring, building, crafting and finishing.

  • Under a stream of glaring light, a rush of water gushed from a long hose. The spray splashed onto a colorless sheet of ice, which aided its molecular brethren in the freezing process. Two men clad in heavy gear and spiky shoes nimbly ran across the lake, moving snow out of the way and pulling the hose in the desired direction.

    One rink took a mere 10 minutes to spray down, but there were several more to go.

  • The annual Hanukkah celebration at the Evergreen Lake House this year took an unusual form.

    Rather than the typical evening lighting of the menorah, Rabbi Levi Brackman of Judaism in the Foothills held a short ceremony on Christmas morning. This year, Hanukkah began Dec. 24 and will end on New Year’s Eve.

    Brackman said it was the first time he’s orchestrated a morning menorah lighting, but that it was good to mix things up a bit.

  • A city set on a hilltop cannot be hidden. And neither can a house decorated with thousands of Christmas lights.

    From Kittredge to Conifer, mountain area residents, organizations and businesses have put up strands of bright-colored bulbs, inflatable snowmen, moving reindeer, Nativity scenes, and many more decorations as a way to celebrate the winter holidays.

  • Risen Lord Lutheran Church is snuggly tucked away in an office building along Conifer’s Sutton Road near Dallman Drive. The interior is humble and unassuming — basic windows, modest furniture and kitchen utilities, and blue skies and white clouds decorating some panels in the ceiling.

    Instead of a large altar, the church has a plain circular table around which worshippers gather for the sacraments.

    In its own way, this worship space feels a bit like a home away from home.

    And that’s really the point, says Pastor Teri Hermsmeyer.

  • The Mountain Rendezvous Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and American Legion Post 2001 commemorated the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor on Sunday.

    The ceremony included a reflection on those who died in the Pearl Harbor attack and the trials of World War II that followed. The chapter’s chaplain, Kathleen Schrader, led the group in benediction, calling to mind all those who gave their lives to defend the United States. And, American Legion member Vern Stelzer read President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous post-attack speech.

  • Cowboy, sawyer, carpenter, barn-raiser, trail-builder, conservationist, preservationist, historian, author, community leader, friend, husband, father.

    The way his friends tell it, Hank Alderfer should be considered for the title of “ Most Interesting Man in the World.”

    Alderfer family members, friends and the Evergreen community gathered Nov. 30 at the Lake House to celebrate Alderfer’s accomplishments and contributions, as well as help launch a book of his Canyon Courier columns, titled “Yesteryear.”