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Today's Features

  • Risen Lord Lutheran Church is snuggly tucked away in an office building along Conifer’s Sutton Road near Dallman Drive. The interior is humble and unassuming — basic windows, modest furniture and kitchen utilities, and blue skies and white clouds decorating some panels in the ceiling.

    Instead of a large altar, the church has a plain circular table around which worshippers gather for the sacraments.

    In its own way, this worship space feels a bit like a home away from home.

    And that’s really the point, says Pastor Teri Hermsmeyer.

  • It’s lean times at the Venue Theatre Company in Conifer, but not in the usual sense: the education-based youth theater is in short supply of space, funds and extra hands — all the consequences of success.

  • Evergreen Fine Art Gallery will be celebrating its 25th anniversary Saturday, conjuring memories of the many events held at the high-end gallery over the years and the artists it has championed.

    The festivities begin at 2 p.m. and will feature more than 15 prominent artists who have been favorites at the gallery. Stacey Patterson, Pem Dunn and Robert Spooner will be on hand featuring recent works, and Edward Aldrich will conduct live demonstrations. Models will mix with the crowd displaying Andrea Li’s handcrafted jewelry.

  • Once again the Evergreen Chorale, along with the Jefferson Symphony Orchestra, will embrace the season with their annual Christmas production. This year holiday classics and the mini-opera “Amahl and the Night Visitors” will be presented Friday evening and Sunday afternoon at two separate locations. Because both shows promise to draw a huge audience, the opera and musical selections will be performed at Denver’s 100-year-old Central Presbyterian Church on Friday and at Rockland Community Church on Sunday.

  • The bands might not be very well known, but the familiar intimate stage, theater seating and stories about the musicians’ songs and inspirations are making Conifer Loves Music a local attraction.

    The music series kicked off its second round of shows last weekend at StageDoor Theatre — headlined by Denver/New York City-based band The Winchester Local and Texas rock band Lindby.

    But before either band took the stage, Conifer’s Ben Powell opened the show, performing his music live for the very first time.

  • By Penny Randell, for the Courier

    The Evergreen Chorale will welcome a guest performance of “James and the Giant Peach” on Sunday at Center/Stage Theatre, acted and directed by the Phamaly Theatre Company from Denver. This professional-grade musical is for the whole family and promises to provide a festive path toward Thanksgiving.

  • Last Friday, Conifer’s Venue Theatre Company kicked off its fourth season with a stage adaptation of the 25-year old Disney film “Beauty and the Beast.”

    Directed by Nelson Conway, the three-hour musical sees nearly 30 students from five area high schools share the story of how Prince Adam — transformed into the animalistic Beast by an enchantress after refusing her shelter — captured the heart of bookish but kind Belle.

  • By Penny Randell, for the Courier

    Beginning this Friday, StageDoor Theatre in Conifer will present "Fiddler on the Roof," an ambitious production chosen to encourage as many high school students as possible to participate.

    The senior high company at StageDoor took on the beloved musical, which premiered on Broadway in 1964 and then was made into a cherished movie in 1971. 

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Nov. 3 will be a homecoming of sorts for John McEuen.

    The California native, who is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966, lived in Clear Creek for 20 years.

    “It’s nice,” McEuen said in an interview, noting that Idaho Spring is close to skiing and not too far from the Denver airport. “There are nice people; it was a growing little town.”

  • By Andrea Tritschler, For the Courier

    Tucked away on the side of Pleasant Park Road is a small, old cemetery, so much a part of the landscape it often goes unnoticed.

    But on Saturday, the Conifer Historical Society made Kemp Cemetery the star of its show, with a tour that highlighted why.