Today's Features

  • One year after a state-overseen prescribed burn re-ignited in high winds and torched 4,100 acres south of Conifer, officials have made several changes to address some of the glitches in procedures and protocols that were apparent during the horrific blaze.

    But for victims of the Lower North Fork Fire last March, the changes have amounted to too little, and have come decidedly too late.

  • Quigley is Evergreen Meadows’ new best friend.

    The 4-year-old soft-coated Wheaten terrier saved the subdivision along Highway 73 from a wildfire on March 18. He was honored Monday night by Evergreen firefighters for his keen sense of smell and perseverance in getting his owner to walk across the backyard and find flames in a pile of dry pine needles on a neighbor’s property. The fire ignited after ashes that weren’t completely cooled had been thrown out, and the wind re-ignited them.

  • It was a fitting four-leaf clover at the Rotary Club of Conifer’s fourth annual St. Patrick’s Day fund-raiser: tasty food, friendly companions, delectable drink and a worthy cause.

    St. Laurence Episcopal, which serves as a church 364 days a year, took a day off March 16 and dressed up as an Irish pub — complete with furnished tables, signs, balloons and lights strung around the walls.

    “The energy is just amazing,” said Rotary president Suzanne Barkley. “It just feels great in here.”

  • For many people, art and science don’t mix. However, scientists and artists have shared an interdisciplinary connection for centuries. Artists relied upon the work of biologists to learn how to properly depict anatomic details of the animal kingdom. Conversely, scientist relied on artists’ works as a teaching guide to illustrate scientific texts. In an upcoming Evergreen exhibit by microbiologist-turned-photographer Michael Gabridge, viewers will see that the boundaries between art and science, while once believed to be conventionally steadfast, are unexpectedly fluid.

  • When Doris and John Zesbaugh retired and moved to Evergreen 16 years ago, little did they know that they would take on nearly a full-time job to help the homeless.

    The couple, both 83, work tirelessly on behalf of a soup kitchen called Street Reach that is operated out of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in downtown Denver.

  • In the wake of a tempestuous election season, it’s comforting and inspiring to reflect upon the beginnings of our nation. The Evergreen Chorale, in its latest production of the musical “1776,” provides us with the opportunity to travel back in time to witness the fights, debates and compromises that led to the founding of our country. The show also reminds us that one can always find much humor in the serious business of creating and running a country.

  • Many people in Evergreen knew Robert “Bob” Greenwood as a good neighbor and volunteer coach at the high school. 

    Perhaps not as well known are Greenwood’s accomplishments in professional and collegiate sports. An Ohio native with a passion for athletics, Greenwood played football for the Cleveland Rams in the 1940s. He also competed in football and track at Ohio University before transferring to Kent State, from which he graduated.

    Greenwood gained the most recognition for his abilities as a college basketball coach.