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Today's Features

  • Marshdale Elementary School held its annual PTA-sponsored Science Fair on Feb. 3. Thanks to all of the students, volunteer judges, teachers and staff that made it so successful. More than 125 young scientists experimented and created wonderful projects at the fair.

  • Some people used the words “relocation center” to describe Camp Amache in southeast Colorado, but Kittredge resident Robert Fuchigami calls it what it was to him: a concentration camp.

    Today, his memories of the World War II internment center no longer hold Fuchigami captive; he’s made peace with what happened during the war, when thousands of Japanese-Americans were imprisoned by hatred and suspicion. Today, he’s fascinated with the camp’s history, not bound by his memories of the three years his family spent there.

  • Faye Hess may be almost 93 years old, but she can compete with people half her age when it comes to sewing and making quilts.

    Hess recently completed an enormous quilting project that she is donating to Mt. Evans Hospice, which is holding a raffle to raise money for the hospice.

    Tickets are $10 each or three for $25 and can be purchased online at www.mtevans.org or in person from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3081 Bergen Peak Drive. A drawing will be held on the Fourth of July at the party for the Freedom Run, a benefit for Mt. Evans Hospice.

  • Ten years ago, when Pastor Vera Guebert-Steward was looking for her first job as a minister, she heard about an opening at Evergreen Lutheran Church.

    She had a strong feeling that the church near Marshdale would be the right place for her. When she saw the little buildings and interviewed for the job, she was even more certain. When they offered her the job, it took about 30 seconds to decide.

  • Ever wonder how much stuff you can pack into a 10-foot-by-10-foot space? If you live in Evergreen, the answer is two cast members, one director, five crew members, a full-size set, props, costumes, and … an award-winning theater production.

  • Over the years, many Evergreen artists have said they would like to make our foothills enclave a “Paris in the mountains,” with artists lining the streets painting en plein air and visitors flocking to a place where they can view and purchase quality art. Rather than turning Evergreen into France, a group of newly formed artists is going one step further — bringing France to Evergreen, in their upcoming show “La Belle France” at the Center for the Arts Evergreen Rotary Gallery at Center/Stage.

  • Sam Leslie, an eighth-grader at Evergreen Middle School, placed first in Colorado in the National PTA-sponsored Reflections Contest in the middle school division for his original music composition titled “Hand In Hand.”
    The composition was written and performed by Sam on guitar and cello. The Reflections Program promotes original works in the arts in schools across the country. Sam placed first also in 2008 and second in 2005 and 2007.

  • Five area youth contestants were winners in the local competition of the annual Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship held Feb. 19 at the Wulf Recreation Center.

    They were Christian Markey (boys age 10), Jack Patterson (boys age 11), Kara Coughlin (girls age 12), Steven Belrose (boys age 12) and Keenan O’Hearn (boys age 13). As champions, they earned the right to compete at the state contest on Saturday, March 19, at the St. Thomas More Gym in Centennial.

  • Editor's note: As our country fights its way out of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Clear Creek Courant is remembering those who fought for their very survival through the days following Black Tuesday into the winds of the Dust Bowl and onto the beaches of the Second World War.

    Longtime Empire resident Duane Lewis was 8 when he was given a trumpet and began learning to play music.
    He was 15 years old in 1929 when the stock market crashed, pitching the United States into the dark years of the Great Depression.

  • “How could that moron over there really be God?”
    — Shams-u-din Muhammad Hafiz (1320-1389)

    I like him right away. Deepak is waiting for us, leaning against the back of his SUV, dressed in sweat pants and shirt with a long scarf knotted around his neck, legs crossed at the ankle like the Hindu god of love.
    “Namaste. Finally we meet,” he greets me with warmth as my husband introduces us.