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Today's Features

  • Favored with a vast store of infallible opinions and skin of purest alabaster, I don’t get out of the hermitage that often. But if my prudent seclusion helps ensure a creamier complexion and more temperate foothills social climate, it tends to leave me in the dark about many of my neighbors’ diverse and interesting activities.

  • Elk Creek firefighters spent two days recently practicing rope rescues in anticipation of the October opening of Staunton State Park.

    The park will be home to several rock-climbing routes near Staunton Rocks, and firefighters anticipate calls from park users, said Alex Parks, the department’s technical rescue coordinator and a firefighter/EMT. Crews have been familiarizing themselves with the park’s layout over the last two years, including at the Aug. 18-19 training session.

  • The nature of improvisational comedy means that it’s always fresh and new. After several successful seasons of comedy in the mountains, the Evergreen Players Improv Comedy troupe, EPiC, is working to keep not only its comedy fresh, but the format of its shows as well. For the first time, the talented actors of EPiC will be complemented by local musicians and on-site food service. Audiences will leave after a side-splitting, stomach-busting, ear-tickling good time.

  • Bantering about the term “gestalt” at cocktail parties is a good way to send people running for the hills. The word stems from studies conducted in 1920s Germany, and in its most complex form, gestalt is a form of psychology that is interested in higher-order cognitive process relative to behaviorism. When boiled down to its essence, gestalt theory holds that the whole is more than the sum of its parts.

  • “The guy who’s riding a $1,000 bicycle is not going to stop if he doesn’t have a way to secure it,” says Kittredge resident Jerry Smith.

    Representing the Lariat Loop Alliance, Smith is contacting businesses and agencies in Evergreen and Kittredge to generate interest in placing creatively designed bike racks on their properties.

    “The bicycle racks accommodate people and give them a place to park,” Smith said.

  • The thought actually hit me earlier in the week that 19 years before, as a mere 21-year-old in Craigsville, Va., of all places, I stepped into a professional wrestling ring for the first time as a referee. But that's not where my love affair with what is now more prominently called sports entertainment began.

  • Lots and lots of bubbles constituted the theme of a two-hour class attended by more than a half-dozen children last week.

    The kids played with bubble makers and soap at the Hiwan History Museum, creating huge bubbles, tiny bubbles, square bubbles and triangle bubbles. They learned how to catch them and put their arms through them — all while being outdoors and having fun.

    Although bubble making was entertaining for the youngsters, it was a learning opportunity, too.

  • The Evergreen Players have been honored in recent years for their authenticity in acting, directorial innovation and willingness to push the boundaries of contemporary community theater. In 1967 when “Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical” debuted off-Broadway, the show was lauded for similar risk-taking and cultural significance. What better combination than a groundbreaking theater group presenting the musical that broke new ground in musical theater?

  • Alicia Brummer and Duncan Dotterrer of Denver will marry Sept 29 at Chatauqua Park in Boulder.
    Brummer is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Brummer of Baltimore, Md., and Dotterrer is the son of Ilona Dotterrer or Boulder and Bill Dotterrer of Commerce City.