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Today's Features

  •  Susan Lams, 67, met her new husband, retired truck driver Carl Wuertley, 77, while she was working as a personal care provider in his apartment near Little Cub Creek a couple of years ago.

    But the romance didn't really ignite until around Valentine's Day of this year, when he decided to ask her out to dinner at the Bear Creek Tavern in Kittredge.

    Wuertley said he had been getting little hints that maybe their relationship was about something more than just housecleaner and tenant, such as a birthday card with a personal message.

  • “Guys and Dolls” is a classic Broadway hit that has been reprised hundreds of times. The Colorado Children’s Theatre’s reprisal is no less sentimental than a Broadway revival of the show. “Guys and Dolls” was the first show performed by the Colorado Children’s Theatre when it opened its doors in Evergreen seven years ago.

  • The Evergreen Chorale is gearing up for a big finish to its 2011-12 season. Over the next three weeks, the Chorale will perform some of the most beloved choral music of the last four centuries in two separate concert events, “Stars I Shall Find” and Gustav Mahler's 2nd Symphony.

     

  • In spite of budget cuts and increasing class sizes, there are still many things to celebrate in our mountain area schools. As a community, we celebrate athletic success, and we celebrate musical accomplishments. For more than 15 years, a group of Jefferson County educators and parents has organized an event to celebrate academic success, particularly success in writing and literacy. Each year more than 350 students from all mountain schools gather to celebrate the skills of writing and storytelling at the Mountain Area Young Writers’ Conference.

  • The Prelude to the Evergreen Children’s Chorale is celebrating its 15th anniversary this year. In honor of this momentous birthday, the Prelude is excited to bring audiences a jungle jumpin’ with jazz in the Disney classic “Jungle Book.” The Prelude is made up of 33 mountain-area second-, third- and fourth-graders representing 13 different schools — public, private and home-schooled.

     

  • “Curtains,” the newest production at StageDoor Theatre, is a comedy whodunit that pays homage to the brassy musical comedies of the 1950s. “Curtains” was created by the powerhouse musical-theater team of Fred Ebb and John Kander, who were responsible for such great musicals as “Chicago” and “Cabaret.”

  • By Pam Montgomery

    My name is Pam Montgomery, and I’m a foodie. I love anything to do with food: eating it, cooking it, shopping for it, and getting others excited about it. I enjoy discovering a new restaurant or coffee shop, eating meals outside, browsing farmers markets, and even grocery shopping. It’s true. I can wander for a very long time in a produce aisle, take advantage of every taste offered, and always have my eye out for those discount sections hidden in the back.

  • Springtime in the Rockies can mean a lot of different things — a last-minute snowstorm before winter gives up for another year, tulips pushing up through the slowly thawing ground, or birds mating at the sign of warmer weather. Visitors to the Alliance Artists of Evergreen show “Springtime in the Rockies,” at the Center for the Arts Rotary Gallery at Center/Stage, will be privy to delightful images that are sure to take the chill off the final days of winter.

  • A traditional farce is a light, humorous play in which the plot depends on a skillfully exploited situation rather than the development of character. The Evergreen Players are pleased to use their upcoming production of “Black Comedy” to give audiences a laugh while hopefully bringing some much needed light to one family in darkness.

  • Nita the goose is lonely no more.

    The 7-year-old goose, who lost her mate two months ago has found two new friends, a mated pair named Harry and Sally.

     

    Harry and Sally also are white Chinese geese like Nita, and they came to Nita’s owners, Marie and George McLaughlin of Morrison, through a High Timber Times subscriber.

    “She didn’t want her name used in the paper,” Marie said. The woman had rescued the two geese but she already had chickens, so she didn’t especially want the geese.