Today's Features

  • As the Fat Babies closed down the Elks Lodge ballroom on Saturday night, most of the band took a break while a trio of piano, drums and clarinet serenaded the dozen or so couples who remained on the dance floor. And, for a moment, the ballroom felt alive with the presence of past generations of jazz fans and musicians. The band seemed fuller than its three pieces.

    For newcomers and those unfamiliar with the genre, the 2016 Evergreen Jazz Festival was a new experience. But for many of the festival attendees, jazz music and dancing are not only a hobby but a tradition.

  • As her father walked her down the aisle, Jacqueline Davis saw her groom, Sean Toomey, and 30 family members and friends surrounded by the beautiful artwork of St. Peter’s Basilica.

    Rather than a local ceremony or a tropical destination wedding, Catholic couple Sean and Jacqueline Toomey were married at the Vatican on June 6. The honor is a rare one, as only four couples from the United States wed at the Vatican each year.

  • Former Conifer resident Jana Elliott, who was killed in a highway crash July 10 after stopping to assist other motorists in Lakewood, is remembered as a person who always wanted to help others.

    Elliott was a passenger in a vehicle traveling east on West Sixth Avenue near Indiana Street when she and the driver, Sharon Young, saw a bicycle fall off a car in front of them.

  • Editor’s note: This story is part of a continuing series on the growing number of elderly in the mountain area.

    With the nation’s senior population expected to double within the next 15 years, the pinch to keep pace will be felt nowhere more keenly than at the Seniors’ Resource Center.

  • The Great Plains in general, and Kansas in particular, might seem like a barren landscape compared to the breathtaking beauty of the Colorado Rockies. Frontier explorer Zebulon Pike certainly thought so, supposedly calling the region the “Great American Desert.”

    But photographer Jim Griggs of McPherson, Kan., says that, if photographing the Great Plains has taught him anything, it’s that “if you can take good photos there, you can take them anywhere.”

  • Increased foot traffic at area monuments, statues, sculptures, schools, churches, trailheads and other landmarks partly is thanks to Pokémon GO.

    The smart-phone game application, which launched two weeks ago and is now the biggest mobile game in U.S. history, encourages players to find virtual creatures called Pokémon. The game uses the phones’ GPS to track the players’ movements and locations, and rewards them for visiting local landmarks.

  • Yoga at the recreation center is customary, and yoga outside with a scenic view is ideal. But yoga on a paddleboard on a pond with mountain views is a bit unusual.

    On July 13, six students prepared for bent-knee, or sridaiva, yoga — also known as bowspring — on paddleboards in Buchanan Ponds.

  • If you can’t see the forest for the trees, maybe that’s because you’re in a treehouse.

    The Evergreen area has a wide variety of treehouses that make their owners proud — from a Hobbit-like playhouse to one with a zip-line attached to a playhouse/treehouse with a suspension bridge. Don’t forget the “Geometree,” an octagonal treehouse.

  • Toad. Scorpion. Snake. Owl.

    This lineup of nocturnal stars won over the 30 library visitors who came to see them July 11.

    The Evergreen Library hosted a “Creatures of the Night” presentation by the Sedalia-based Nature’s Educators, as part of its children’s program. The educators presented the animals, and informed younger and older audience members how each had adapted to live and hunt during the nighttime.

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Nov. 3 will be a homecoming of sorts for John McEuen.

    The California native, who is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966, lived in Clear Creek for 20 years.

    “It’s nice,” McEuen said in an interview, noting that Idaho Spring is close to skiing and not too far from the Denver airport. “There are nice people; it was a growing little town.”