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Today's Features

  • The spicy aroma of Gumbo Ya-Ya filled the working home of the Humphrey History Park and Museum on Saturday afternoon. 

    As the gumbo simmered on the stove, Angela Rayne, executive director of the park and the class' teacher, rolled out sweet dough to make beignets for the Cajun meal.

  • The Mountain Fold club in Evergreen wants you to know that origami isn’t just folded paper cranes.

    The cranes are the most popular origami sculpture, but at Mountain Fold meetings, the group makes paper sculptures that are functional and creative.

    At a meeting Sunday afternoon at the Evergreen Library, the group made picture frames, including the stand and small gift boxes. One youth created a small doll, and another made ninja stars.

  • A retired U.S. Marine colonel wants to make a Hollywood movie about 10th Mountain Division greats Earl Clark and Dick Over. 

    Clark, 95, passed away just after Christmas at his Littleton home. He and Over, 91, of Lookout Mountain, traveled around Colorado for the last several years to discuss their experiences in World War II and during mountain training at Camp Hale near Leadville.

  • Friends and neighbors told stories at a candlelight vigil to honor Greg Henika on Sunday evening at Evergreen High School.

  • Skaters at Evergreen Lake on Jan. 11 were treated to car races on the ice — radio-controlled cars, that is.

    The small race course was in a corner of the rink, and skaters came by to watch as the cars, 14 inches long by 8 inches wide, moved deftly around hairpin turns and through straightaways. Think video games, only much more real and out of doors.

  • When a dog goes missing in unfamiliar territory during an arctic cold wave, the odds of his survival can dim the hopes of an anguished owner.

    However, after nine days of searching — and lots of help from mountain area residents and community organizations — Steve Gilligan of Chicago found Kid, his beloved blue heeler, on Dec. 30.

  • Temperatures in the single digits didn't discourage the hundreds of celebrants who thronged Evergreen Lake to watch fireworks and welcome the new year.

    The annual Skate the Lake event, which benefits DriveSmart Evergreen-Conifer, didn't disappoint, with ice skating, general merriment and two rounds of pyrotechnics.

  • In 2005, the members of Congregation Beth Evergreen took a leap of faith. The 30-year-old congregation had experienced growth, purchased land and built Evergreen’s first synagogue. Now it was the time for the next step: a full-time rabbi.

    After months of interviews, the board of directors hired Jamie Arnold, a young rabbi ordained in 1999 who was serving at Temple Sinai in Amherst, N.Y.

  • Mirada Fine Art represents an array of talented artists from around the world. This month, Mirada highlights a local artist better known in art markets such as Los Angeles, New Orleans and New York, rather than in his own hometown of Evergreen. Andrew Baird is a former art teacher from Evergreen High School who has become a national phenomenon for his unique artwork. Baird’s first exhibition in Colorado in more than three years, “Beautiful Chaos,” opens Friday at Mirada Fine Art in Indian Hills.

  • Sculptor Dan Toone stood in front of his piece as it was being installed in downtown Evergreen.

    While Toone, from Taylorsville, Utah, said he didn’t worry that something might go wrong during the installation, his crossed arms and hand over his mouth belied something a bit different.

    The 300-pound, 11-foot metal sculpture called "Austere" now stands in front of Evergreen Crafters as part of the yearly Sculpture Walk sponsored by Sculpture Evergreen, formerly Art for the Mountain Community.