Today's Features

  • Undaunted by rain showers, Rocky Graziano joined a large gathering of people taking the inaugural walk across the new connector trail leading from downtown to Evergreen Lake Park on the evening of May 29. 

    A longtime Evergreen resident, Graziano launched the initiative to build the connector trail with fellow Curmudgeon Peter Link.

    With a twinkle in his eye, Graziano said he and Link were “complicit” in coming up with the idea and presenting it to the Downtown Evergreen Economic District several years ago.

  • Holly O’Neal has a passion for making sure women can defend themselves if they are attacked — especially high school graduates attending college in the fall.

    Coincidentally, Nick Kapande from Nick’s Pro Fitness has the same passion.

    The two put their heads together, and the result was two two-hour seminars last week to teach high school graduates, a few moms and a couple of younger siblings the basics of self-defense.

  • If experience is the best teacher, then Evergreen High School senior English students just learned tons during their final project.

    The 150 students found internships or mentoring opportunities, performed activities and wrote about their experiences in a variety of formats to culminate their high school studies.

    This is exactly the way English teachers Chris Corbo and Maurissa Moore wanted it.

    This past semester was their first attempt at a capstone English course, and they are already tweaking it for the fall.

  • Area Scouts understand what Memorial Day is all about.

    Scouts from Troops 737 and 1776 and Packs 39 and 50 volunteered their time Friday evening and Saturday morning to place American flags on veterans’ graves at Bear Creek Cemetery and Evergreen Memorial Park in time for the holiday.

    The soggy ground made the work easy, and the rain abated temporarily while the Scouts did their patriotic duty.

  • Marking the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, an exhibit illustrating the role of Jefferson County in World War II opened at the Hiwan Homestead Museum on Friday.

    Titled “We Can Do It: Jefferson County in World War II,” the exhibit features a large aerial photo of the former Denver Ordnance Plant in Lakewood, where 22,000 employees of the Remington Arms Co. produced ammunition for the war effort in the 1940s.

  • After cleaning trash from Kittredge Community Park, residents had an opportunity to see the plan for park improvements on Saturday. Although wet snow that began falling about noon deterred some participants, a small group gathered under canopies to enjoy lunch and discuss the project.

    Evergreen landscape architect Diane Schade contributed her services to design the plan, which features creative playground equipment for youngsters, including a covered sliding board structure and rotating rides.

  • An introduction to a horse can change someone’s life.

    In the case of Mountain Pal, a palomino quarter horse who died of natural causes recently, he was introduced to many young children near owner Randi Levin’s home, and in at least one case, he changed a life.

  • The now-defunct Journey Community Church — the upstart congregation that once drew hundreds of Sunday worshipers to the Conifer High auditorium — has severed its last tangible tie to the area by selling its 45-acre ranch.

  • ABC’s "Extreme Weight Loss" coach Bruce Pitcher took a unique firefighter fitness challenge at Evergreen Fire/Rescue on Monday.

    He passed with flying colors.

    Pitcher finished up the tough, local challenge in 1:54 minutes, a few seconds under the cut-off time of 2 minutes considered “really good” by Evergreen Fire/Rescue volunteer firefighters.
    The fire department-sponsored challenge on Monday was followed by a dinner, and Pitcher was the featured speaker.

  • You couldn’t open a newspaper or Web browser this summer without hearing about the new novel “Go Set a Watchman.” This book was the second published novel of Harper Lee, the famous author of the beloved classic “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Although the new book’s release caused a resurgence in interest in the reclusive author, interest in Lee’s first book never waned, and “To Kill a Mockingbird” is one of the best-selling novels of all time.