.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Children and their families eager to have breakfast with Santa and Mrs. Claus filled the Evergreen Lake House on Saturday morning.

    “We served 325 breakfasts,” said Joyce Masyga of the Evergreen Downtown Business Association, which sponsors the annual event.

    Because so many people wanted to attend this year’s breakfast, an extra seating was added to accommodate them. The timing of the event on the Thanksgiving holiday weekend adds to its popularity, Masyga said.

  • By Gabrielle Porter, for the Courier

    Judy Berna’s original idea for welcoming her son home from Afghanistan was not elaborate.

    The Evergreen resident drove past the “Welcome to Evergreen” sign near Walmart about six months ago, and noticed it had been decorated with flags. Her son, 21-year-old Army Specialist Michael Berna, deployed Feb. 1 to Afghanistan with Apache Troop 1-75 Cavalry of the 101st Airborne Division.

  • Father Christmas would have been pleased when more than 200 guests gathered at the Evergreen Lake House on Saturday evening for the 14th annual Wine Tasting and Festival of Trees. 

    Presented by the Conifer Area Chamber of Commerce, the event brought together local businesses, Colorado wineries and chamber supporters for a night of mostly giving and, for some lucky silent-auction bidders, a night of receiving. 

  • Empty Bowls is truly an event for the community, by the community.

    “Everything you’re enjoying today has been donated by someone in this community. That’s what makes this such a great event,” Holly Simon, board member for the Mountain Resource Center, told the folks assembled to enjoy soup and raise funds for those in need.

    The annual Empty Bowls event raises money for the MRC and its efforts to help feed hungry families. The MRC hosted the first day of the two-day event last Wednesday at the organization’s main office in Conifer.

  • You can wear your pajamas to the special Polar Express-theme train ride, as well as visit with Santa.

    Evergreen resident Rick Bernstein has put together a 75-minute production and train ride to the “North Pole.” It includes flying reindeer and dancing waiters at the Colorado Railroad Museum in Golden. 

    “We have reindeer that look like elk, and (Evergreen) has elk that look like reindeer,” Bernstein joked when asked about the production.

  • Evergreen resident Patty Potter once was rescued from an attacking bear by her dog Bella. Now she’s honoring Bella’s memory by helping other people rescue dogs.

    Potter started the Bella Pet Insurance Fund three years ago as a national nonprofit that provides health insurance grants to young people who want to rescue dogs. After three years of raising money and slowly gaining public recognition, the organization is ready to start helping more dog rescuers.

  • The partnership of artists David and Danna Cuin goes beyond a love of glass. The couple, both of whom have professional backgrounds in technical specialties, jumped into the world of art in 1998 and have never looked back. This month, the Cuins are approaching retirement from their second careers, as artists. After showing their work in galleries throughout the world, the Cuins will bring their entire collection of glass pieces home to the Evergreen Gallery.

  • Many dictionaries define “reality check” as “an assessment to determine if one’s circumstances or expectations conform to reality.” In the Evergreen Players’ latest evening of short plays, “Reality Check,” the actors and audience members alike will find themselves transported to four distinct and wonderfully warped worlds, each of which makes us question what reality truly is.

  • Congregation members and the community now have had a chance to see the new Bergen Park Church at 31919 Rocky Village Drive in Evergreen.

    A two-day open house on Saturday and Sunday included refreshments, crafts for the kids, chances to win entertainment tickets, and tours.

    "It's a pretty big deal for us," said Pastor Jim Demolar.

    The new 11,000-square-foot church cost almost $2.8 million to build. The congregation pledged about two-thirds of the building cost; a bank loan covered the rest.