.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Evergreen teenager Jenna Weidner was singing before she could talk.

    “My mom said that when I was 1 year old, the first time I ever sang we were at the store …,” Jenna, 16, said with a laugh. “She was talking to someone, and they just look over at me and they were like, ‘I think your daughter is singing.’ It was like “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.’ … My mom said, ‘You hummed it perfectly.’ ”

  • The 11th annual Mountain Area Home and Garden Show kicks off at the end of next month, bringing together as many as 110 providers and good and services with thousands of attendees.

  • A short film shot in Evergreen last month brought cast and crew members from New York, Tennessee, Denver and New Zealand to town, and it’s hoped the drama about a mother and daughter facing their differences could put Evergreen on the map as a location for future films.

    “It has the possibility to put Evergreen in a spotlight that it hasn’t had before,” producer and Evergreen local Payton Dunham said. “Evergreen is a cool little town, but most people don’t know it’s up here.”

  • The Buffalo Bill Museum and Grave is offering visitors free admission on Sunday to commemorate the Western legend’s 170th birthday.

     

    The celebration of the life of William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody takes place from noon to 4 p.m. at the museum on Lookout Mountain Road.

  • Who knew Abraham Lincoln’s birthday could be a romantic holiday?

    Last Thursday, the day before what would have been Lincoln’s 207th birthday, Evergreen Middle School social studies teacher Owen Volzke proposed to his girlfriend of two years, Ashley Safford, a sixth-grade math teacher at the school.

    Volzke chose the day because he has an affinity for Lincoln and because the couple watched the movie “Lincoln,” starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Field, on one of their first dates.

  • They say you can’t mix business with pleasure. But how about mixing your business and personal lives?

    Evergreen is filled with couples who spend their days together at work, then spend their nights together at home. While this might be an impossibility for some, these couples say it works well for them.

    All it takes is excellent communication, a lot of respect and a strong sense of humor.

  • The food bank at Evergreen Christian Outreach is known for helping area residents keep food in the cupboard during lean times, but it also keeps furry friends from going without, thanks to an annual dog-food drive by Mountain Parks Veterinary Hospital. 

    This year's holiday drive netted 3,200 pounds of pet food, the largest donation since EChO began receiving the annual contribution in 2011.

  • Hard work, endless hours of practice and a resilient spirit carried the Evergreen High Poms back to national competition this year — and their trip to Orlando, Fla., in late January culminated with a fifth-in-the-nation finish in hip-hop.

    “We decided that we were going to go to finals this year,” head coach Monique O’Neill said of her squad.

    And reach the finals they did.

  • Acrylics and dyes. Metal and wood. Glass and clay. Gold, silver and bronze. Dazzling neons and muted tones. The gentle tones of wind chimes. The soft texture of cloth. Bright and dazzling photographs of nature.

    The Center for the Art’s 37th annual Summerfest once again turned Buchanan Park into an eclectic display of artistry, from clothing and jewelry to paintings and woodcarvings. Plus, with food, drinks, music and other entertainment, the entire field was alive with an assortment of activities for visitors to enjoy.

  • Wild: Some are born to be it, some explore it on foot or in four-wheelers. Next weekend, Mirada Fine Art explores the animal kingdom of the West with “WILD,” a new exhibit featuring work from a dozen artists who have their own ideas about what it means to be wild.

    According to gallery owner Steve Sonnen, the exhibit resulted from a conversation about Colorado wildlife and how much of the artwork showcased at the gallery represents nature and its wild denizens.