.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Did you ever wish there was a book that could tell you everything you need to know to be successful in life? In the case of StageDoor Theatre’s upcoming production of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," the talented high school players don’t need a book to succeed. This silly and satirical production pokes fun at corporate culture and effortlessly transports the audience straight back to the skinny ties and A-line dresses of the "Mad Men" era.

  • The floodwaters in Evergreen have receded, and community members are pulling together to support one another. Janice Sugg, the featured artist at Evergreen Fine Art, and gallery owner Barb Hadley had no way of knowing that the title of Sugg’s show would be so prophetic.

  • Evergreen resident Kathy Magnani was recently awarded the Frist Humanitarian Award at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center.
    Magnani has devoted almost 850 volunteer hours as a "cuddler" in the neonatal intensive-care unit. She also is the sub-coordinator, helping to fill shifts when other volunteers are unavailable. She recently started teaching knitting to ante-partum moms.

  • When life gives you lemons, make lemonade

    Melissa Wood, owner of Madera Salon, had to close her shop temporarily above Cactus Jack’s Saloon, thanks to the recent flooding that heavily damaged the first floor of the building.

    Since Wood can’t serve clients at her shop, she decided to give back to the community with her talents: She’s giving free haircuts to clients of Evergreen Christian Outreach.

    “I just decided with the flooding and everything, this was a time when people are needing more help,” Wood said.

  • Each year, the American Art Awards select 25 galleries with different strengths. In March 2013, Mirada Fine Art was named the AAA’s Best in Choice in Colorado and one the top 25 galleries in the nation.
    “Mirada Fine Art has impressed us with their history, drive and unique trajectory,” says Thom Bierdz, president of the American Art Awards.

  • Many artists, photographers in particular, suffer from wanderlust. They can be seen perching with their tripods on the stone walls of Santorini or lugging their camera equipment through the rivers of Katmai, Alaska.

  • “I still have that vivid picture in my mind of Boston,” said Army veteran Paul Heiser as he recalled embarking on a ship headed for England in the midst of World War II. “We zigzagged across the Atlantic on the USS Mount Vernon,” he said.

     

    Heiser was reminiscing with four other members of the 124th Anti-aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion of the U.S. Army, who had come to Evergreen for their annual gathering.

  • As the late-summer days grow shorter, and the shadows begin to lengthen, children start planning for Halloween. The costume catalogs are filled with ghosts and mad scientists, and point to our human obsession with the underbelly of life.

  • Singing as they piloted wheelbarrows filled with compost, members of Boy Scout Troop 888 were hard at work at the community garden in Buchanan Park on Sunday morning.

    “You have to use brute force,” Dillon Mathues said to another Scout who was unloading a pile of compost they were moving.

    The Scouts were learning how to create and manage compost to earn gardening merit badges and advance in their ranks. They also seemed to be having a good time while chopping discarded plants to make more compost.

  • Evergreen is fortunate to have a large artistic community, rich in both experience and media. But of all the mountain area artists, only one can claim six decades of continual artistic work in a range of more than 15 media. For this reason, the Center for the Arts Evergreen is pleased to present “Six Decades of an Artist’s Journey: Roger Ambrosier.”