Today's Features

  • A historic volunteer fire department siren now has a prominent spot at Evergreen Fire/Rescue thanks to a high school student’s Eagle Scout project.

    The siren was once used by fire department volunteers in the region for years. Volunteer “kitchen dispatchers” with red telephones from the fire department could activate the siren by pushing a button on their phones. When volunteer firefighters called in, the “kitchen dispatchers” would give them the address of the fire.

  • For the past 16 years, Maren Schreiber has coordinated the Special Needs Program of the Evergreen Park and Recreation District. Beginning with five youngsters when she first assumed the position, Schreiber now plans and leads activities for more than 90 people.

    Participants in her program go swimming, rafting, fishing, horseback riding, bowling — and glide across Evergreen Lake on boats. They scale the climbing wall at Buchanan Rec Center, tend a garden and take trips to places of interest.

    “We do just about everything,” says Schreiber.

  • Evergreen’s historic bell tower is getting a much-needed makeover, and it should be standing sentry over the east end of downtown by the end of the week.

    The nonprofit HistoriCorps brought staff and volunteers to work on the tower, which is part of the historic buildings on the Church of the Transfiguration property. The tower is 115 years old, and it was restored in 1979 by the U.S. Army Reserves, but weather exposure slowly rots the wood, and church officials were afraid the tower might fall.

  • Bogart the mammoth donkey has a new lease on life thanks to the efforts of a West Jefferson Middle School seventh-grader and the kind-hearted staff at Colorado Horse Rescue.

    Bogart was at a feedlot waiting to be sent to a slaughterhouse when 12-year-old Klaire Funderburgh fell in love with the gentle giant.

    “She kept saying, ‘Mom, I can’t let him be killed. I have to save him,’ ” said Klaire’s mother, Kristin Manley.

  • Classic musicals stand the test of time because they have simple story lines, laugh-inducing scripts, and music that sticks with audiences long after the curtain falls. “Anything Goes” is a celebration of the great American musical and one of its greatest composers, Cole Porter. The latest production of this time-honored show, presented by StageDoor Theatre’s high school company, offers a fresh take on this 80-year-old theatrical gem.

  • Surrounded by artists who moved to the mountains for inspiration, art lovers are treated to beautiful canvases filled with golden aspen and photographs of elk in mist-covered meadows. But when the Evergreen Artists Association’s fall show opened Sept. 26, the concept of “mountain aesthetic” was redefined. The EAA’s fall exhibition is the largest juried show in the recent history of the organization and displays works from 125 artists throughout Colorado.

  • It’s definitely not traditional stained glass, and it’s really not traditional public art, either.

    Instead, it’s a long roller-coaster-like ribbon of steel with attached bicycle wheels that are filled with stained glass. The 16-foot sculpture is the creation of Creative Stained Glass Studio, and it will be on its way to Kennesaw, Ga., to be installed in the atrium at AMLI Residential.

  • You never know what message the sign at the Indian Hills Community Center might offer. But one thing is certain: It draws the attention of motorists on Parmalee Gulch Road.

    Some of the weekly slogans are funny; others are thought-provoking riddles. And a few have created quite a stir.

    “I try to keep something up there that will make people smile,” says Indian Hills resident Vince Rozmiarek, who places the weekly messages on the sign. “I’ve adopted it. It’s really fun.”

  • “This is full of spectacular-ness!” exclaimed Sue Comer as she walked through stands of aspen glowing with fall color last Thursday afternoon.

    Comer had traveled from Loveland to a scenic overlook on Highway 103 where many people were gazing in awe at golden-leaved trees in the bright sunshine. The changing aspen also created bright patterns of color in the distant hills, which leaf-gazers were enjoying along with mature aspen they could walk up to and photograph.