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Today's Features

  • Empty Bowls is truly an event for the community, by the community.

    “Everything you’re enjoying today has been donated by someone in this community. That’s what makes this such a great event,” Holly Simon, board member for the Mountain Resource Center, told the folks assembled to enjoy soup and raise funds for those in need.

    The annual Empty Bowls event raises money for the MRC and its efforts to help feed hungry families. The MRC hosted the first day of the two-day event last Wednesday at the organization’s main office in Conifer.

  • You can wear your pajamas to the special Polar Express-theme train ride, as well as visit with Santa.

    Evergreen resident Rick Bernstein has put together a 75-minute production and train ride to the “North Pole.” It includes flying reindeer and dancing waiters at the Colorado Railroad Museum in Golden. 

    “We have reindeer that look like elk, and (Evergreen) has elk that look like reindeer,” Bernstein joked when asked about the production.

  • Evergreen resident Patty Potter once was rescued from an attacking bear by her dog Bella. Now she’s honoring Bella’s memory by helping other people rescue dogs.

    Potter started the Bella Pet Insurance Fund three years ago as a national nonprofit that provides health insurance grants to young people who want to rescue dogs. After three years of raising money and slowly gaining public recognition, the organization is ready to start helping more dog rescuers.

  • By foothills standards, the holiday spirit is in full swing, with seven holiday boutiques over the next few weeks.

  • About 50 young girls were excited and speechless when the snow queen and the ice princess arrived for a special party on Sunday.

    The girls, dressed in their royalty finest, were prepared when the queen asked them to join in singing “Let It Go.” It was all part of a party for young aficionados of the Disney movie “Frozen,” hosted by Wilmot Elementary parent Jennifer Trinco at the Evergreen Elks Lodge.

  • Evergreen’s historic bell tower is getting a much-needed makeover, and it should be standing sentry over the east end of downtown by the end of the week.

    The nonprofit HistoriCorps brought staff and volunteers to work on the tower, which is part of the historic buildings on the Church of the Transfiguration property. The tower is 115 years old, and it was restored in 1979 by the U.S. Army Reserves, but weather exposure slowly rots the wood, and church officials were afraid the tower might fall.

  • A historic volunteer fire department siren now has a prominent spot at Evergreen Fire/Rescue thanks to a high school student’s Eagle Scout project.

    The siren was once used by fire department volunteers in the region for years. Volunteer “kitchen dispatchers” with red telephones from the fire department could activate the siren by pushing a button on their phones. When volunteer firefighters called in, the “kitchen dispatchers” would give them the address of the fire.

  • For the past 16 years, Maren Schreiber has coordinated the Special Needs Program of the Evergreen Park and Recreation District. Beginning with five youngsters when she first assumed the position, Schreiber now plans and leads activities for more than 90 people.

    Participants in her program go swimming, rafting, fishing, horseback riding, bowling — and glide across Evergreen Lake on boats. They scale the climbing wall at Buchanan Rec Center, tend a garden and take trips to places of interest.

    “We do just about everything,” says Schreiber.

  • Bogart the mammoth donkey has a new lease on life thanks to the efforts of a West Jefferson Middle School seventh-grader and the kind-hearted staff at Colorado Horse Rescue.

    Bogart was at a feedlot waiting to be sent to a slaughterhouse when 12-year-old Klaire Funderburgh fell in love with the gentle giant.

    “She kept saying, ‘Mom, I can’t let him be killed. I have to save him,’ ” said Klaire’s mother, Kristin Manley.

  • You never know what message the sign at the Indian Hills Community Center might offer. But one thing is certain: It draws the attention of motorists on Parmalee Gulch Road.

    Some of the weekly slogans are funny; others are thought-provoking riddles. And a few have created quite a stir.

    “I try to keep something up there that will make people smile,” says Indian Hills resident Vince Rozmiarek, who places the weekly messages on the sign. “I’ve adopted it. It’s really fun.”