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Today's Features

  • By Kevin M. Smith, for the Courier

    Mountain area residents got into the holiday spirit on Saturday with the fifth annual Festival of Trees and Wine & Dine event at The Barn at Evergreen Memorial Park.

    “It’s my favorite event,” said Sharon Trilk, who helps coordinate the gala with the Conifer Area Chamber of Commerce.

  • West Jefferson Elementary students were given a special holiday treat on Friday: They attended the performance of a new Christmas play in ballet form.

    Peak Academy of Dance, which is a five-minute walk from the school, performed “A Christmas Eve Ghost Story” for the students.

    The story is written by Danielle Heller, owner of the dance studio, and is being published this year. In a strange twist, she wrote the book to fulfill her need for a new show that dancers at the studio could perform for the holidays.

  • Those who served in the military during the Vietnam War not only faced live fire, they also found themselves in the political crosshairs as well. Many who enlisted or were drafted had not-so-friendly send-offs and even colder welcomes when they returned. As such, a whole generation of servicemen and women went unrecognized and unappreciated at the time.

    And now, as new generations of Americans grow older, they want to understand the circumstances that their parents and grandparents experienced firsthand.

  • Colton Heidenfelder of Evergreen is building a mobile “tiny house” as a way of living a simple, affordable and yet still comfortable life.

    Heidenfelder, 22, and his uncle Scott Tuchscher of Arizona were finishing the exterior of the tiny house last month, before Tuchscher had to return home. Heidenfelder said his goal is to have the house completed by the spring, and to drive the trailer it’s built on to Conifer.

  • The word “missionary” conjures a variety of historical, cultural and religious connotations. But few likely would associate the word with college campuses in Austria — even though a local organization has sent eight young adults overseas for two years to minister to Austrian college students.

  • Once upon a time, people found a mystical forest near their town. No matter what they threw into the forest — beer cans, televisions, couches, animal carcasses — it all magically disappeared. The forest seemed to swallow everything the townspeople dumped there.

    To their chagrin, local residents have found the magical portal where all this trash has spewed out — at various turnouts along Squaw Pass Road. And, on Oct. 26, they gathered to clean up these illegal dumping sites.

  • Every fall, families across the mountain area welcome their old friend Jack — Jack O. Lantern, that is.

    Of course, to find Jack, many trek to their local pumpkin patch to pick out exactly what he will look like this year. Among rows of pumpkins and gourds, visitors young and old decide: taller or smaller; more round or more flat; yellow, orange, red or white.

    Many Evergreen residents, such as Jamie Brand and her children Gus, 9, and Anna, 7, have visited or will visit JP Total’s Pumpkin Patch as part of their annual fall tradition.

  • Imagine that you don’t know how to use a smart phone. Or are unsure how to “Google” something on the Internet. Or you can’t open Microsoft Word to type this sentence.

    Some people reading this don’t have to imagine.

    A fair portion of seniors, both in Evergreen and nationwide, never learned those computer skills, and are now at a disadvantage in the workforce because of it.

    However, Evergreen Christian Outreach is working to change that.

  • In a final nod to National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, local residents came out in droves Saturday to raise funds for the Mountain Peace Shelter via the organization’s first Fill the Bag event — a nod to the Fill the Boot campaign when firefighters raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

  • Lake Powell is magnificent: The blue-green reservoir is more than 100,000 square miles in size, boasts inflows from the Colorado, Escalante and San Juan rivers, straddles the border between Arizona and Utah, and offers a serene spot to all who visit its shores.

    For Conifer resident Sarah Thomas, whose goal was to swim the length of the lake, it represented an exciting challenge but one that turned out to be unexpectedly daunting.