Arts and Entertainment

  • Former Idaho Springs resident McEuen to perform at United Center on Nov. 3

    By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Nov. 3 will be a homecoming of sorts for John McEuen.

    The California native, who is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966, lived in Clear Creek for 20 years.

    “It’s nice,” McEuen said in an interview, noting that Idaho Spring is close to skiing and not too far from the Denver airport. “There are nice people; it was a growing little town.”


    We'd like to know about interesting events or activities. E-mail items of 125 words or less news@evergreenco.com. 


  • 'Peril at Polls' takes center stages — actually, it's melodrama

    At the convention of Colorado’s “Do Nothing Party,” the villain A. Beast — pronounced “best”; the “a” is silent — enters to boos and hisses, and proclaims that he is “one of the convention plotters — I mean, planners.”

    These are only a few of the amusing moments that pervade the melodrama “Peril at the Polls.”

  • New Mirada exhibit to focus on storytelling

    Artists often refrain from providing context for their works. Instead, they leave their work open to personal interpretation, expecting that each painting, photograph or sculpture will bring a unique meaning to each viewer.

    But in a new exhibit called “Storytelling,” opening Saturday at the Mirada Fine Art Gallery in Indian Hills, art lovers will have an opportunity they do not always have — to learn background about each of the 30 to 40 pieces on display.

  • 'Rocky Horror Show' coming to StageDoor Theatre in Conifer

    By Penny Randell, For the Courier

    StageDoor Theatre in Conifer will bring the cult classic “The Rocky Horror Show” to the stage on three weekends this month — including a couple of late-night showings designed to appeal to the movie’s devoted fans.

    The high-energy musical, a campy rock ‘n’ roll tribute to sci-fi and horror flicks, is rated PG-18 and is billed to thrill an adult audience.

  • Local artists open their doors, hearts to patrons

    It’s one thing to see art in a gallery; it’s quite another to see art in studios with artists available to answer questions and talk about their work.

    That’s what the annual Open Door Studios is all about, and attendees at last weekend’s event said they appreciated the one-on-one with artists.

    “It’s lovely to talk with the artists to learn more about their work,” said Eli Barringer of Evergreen, who was experiencing Open Door Studios for the first time.

  • Main Street Fine Art set to present annual all-Colorado show

    By Penny Randell, For the Courier

    Eighty-eight artists from throughout Colorado will exhibit 160 pieces at the annual All Colorado Artists Show in Evergreen during the first three weeks of October. 

    The exhibition, at the Main Street Fine Art Gallery downtown, is a juried show designed to attract some of the best artists in Colorado. It will run from Sept. 30 to Oct. 23, with an opening reception Friday, Sept. 30.

  • Chorale kicks off season with 'My Fair Lady'

    The Evergreen Chorale is kicking off its 44th season Friday with the Lerner and Loewe musical “My Fair Lady.”

    The show’s director, Tim Kennedy of Westminster, said performances will run until Oct. 9. The production includes 33 cast members, 10 crew members and nine orchestra players. The run time is a little over two-and-a-half hours, he said.

  • Local couple celebrating 50 years with Evergreen Players, each other

    2016 is a golden year for John and Kathleen Davis of Evergreen in two ways:

    First, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in March.

    Second, they are celebrating their 50th anniversary as volunteers with the Evergreen Players this month.

    Those who have worked with the Davises agree wholeheartedly that the couple are worth their weight in gold.

  • Young musicians scale jazzy heights

    As Lindy hoppers and hepcats alike gathered in the Elks ballroom during the 15th annual Evergreen Jazz Festival on Friday, the sounds of musicians warming up drifted from the stage. Those notes did not come from professionals but from young, up-and-coming musicians.