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Indian Hills water district adds storage tank to ensure supply in dry months

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By Sandy Barnes

A newly installed water storage tank with a 100,000-gallon capacity is now operational in the Indian Hills Water District.

Last year the Indian Hills Water District board approved construction of the new tank, which is used to store water for customers during dry months when output from wells decreases.

Although the district has four deep wells that provide water for approximately 350 homes in Indian Hills, in the summer the wells produce at a slower rate, said Carl Frank, president of the water district board.

The crew from Kentucky that the board chose for the water tank project began work in early June. Cost of the installation was $175,000, an amount that included engineering, underground piping, concrete work and construction of the new tank.

After being sanitized and passing inspections, the storage tank went online in time for the July 4th weekend — one of the biggest usage times of the year, Frank said.

For the past six years, the water district has been saving money for the new tank, he added. A portion of the revenue the district collects from residents goes into the reserve fund to pay for projects and to avoid bond issues, Frank said.

“We have a good operations team. They do a good job of watching expenses,” he remarked.

In past years, the water district also has added a nitrate-removal plant to its system to control high levels of the substance in some wells. Many wells in Indian Hills have high levels of nitrates, Frank remarked.

Both the water quality and its taste have improved with the new filtration plant, he said.

Because it is a community provider, the water district has to comply with federal and state regulations that set standards for purity and maximum levels of chemicals and minerals. However, the state of Colorado does not regulate private wells.

Indian Hills residents who are served by the water district traditionally use a minimal amount of water, Frank pointed out. The average household use is approximately 3,500 gallons a months, he said.

And, of course, residents who use less water have lower bills than those who use the system more extensively. The rate for Indian Hills water customers is $36 per month for up to 3,000 gallons. For additional usage, the water rate escalates incrementally from $17 to $38 per 1,000 gallons. Residents who use up to 5,000 gallons pay an additional $17 per 1,000, and residents using more than 12,000 gallons pay an additional $38 over the base rate. The Indian Hills water rate did not increase this year.

In addition to providing water to customers, the Indian Hills district also sells water to individuals for 25 cents a gallon at its office at 4491 Parmalee Gulch Road.

Contact Sandy Barnes at sandy@evergreenco.com.